This icon of the Mother of God is based on the Kazan Mother of God icon from Russia. It is part of a matched set; see the Christ icon here.

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Miraculous icon of Kazan Mother of God occupies a special position among all the orthodox relics of Russia.
The sacred image of the Holy Mother appeared in Kazan in 1579.

For Kazan it was the year of terrible disaster: half of the city was destroyed by fire.

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The Mother of God The Inexhaustible Cup by the hand of Matthew Garrett 2010This icon is often a comfort  for those struggling with addiction.

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Holy Family

Posted in Christ, Theotokos, Uncategorized Comments Off

Holy Family by the hand of Matthew Garrett 2008Holy Family icon features the Christ child, the Theotokos and St. Joseph

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The original of this icon is attributed to St. Luke. It is reputed to have traveled extensively before it came to rest in Cyprus where it is credited with numerous miracles and healings. Copies of this icon became commonplace in Russian in the 17th century.

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The Beautiful Gate, also known as the Royal or Holy Doors, stand between the Nave and the Sanctuary in an Orthodox Church. They serve as both as separation and a point of contact between these two areas of the Church. These doors depict the Annunciation — the appearance of the Archangel Gabriel to the Theotokos to tell her that she will conceive and bear Christ, as well as the four evangelists, St. Matthew, St. Mark, St. Luke, and St. John.

These Royal Doors are part of the iconostasis at Holy Transfiguration Antiochian Orthodox Church in Boise, ID.

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This triptych features an icon of the Kykkos Mother of God. The original of this icon is attributed to St. Luke. It is reputed to have traveled extensively before it came to rest in Cyprus where it is credited with numerous miracles and healings. Copies of this icon became commonplace in Russian in the 17th century.

On either side of the Mother of God are depicted St. Andrew the First-Called Apostle and St. George the Trophy-Bearer. This icon was commissioned for a wedding gift and the saints depicted are the patron saints of the couple.

The closed triptych features a byzantine floral cross pattern.

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Glykophilousa Mother of God by the hand of Matthew Garrett, 2010The Glykophilousa Mother of God is of the Tenderness or “Eleousa” type. It depicts the Theotokos holding Christ in a tender embrace. We see Christ’s affection and love for His mother, while she looks out at us, revealing her care for those still in this world.

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Platytera by the hand of Matthew Garrett, 2006The Theotokos “More Spacious then the Heavens” is of the type, Our Lady of the Sign. The Theotokos is the “sign” foretold in Isaiah 7:14: “Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; behold, a virgin shall conceive in the womb, and shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Emmanuel.” The Mother of God is shown in the Orans position, that is a position of prayer or supplication. The Platytera is placed in the apse of Orthodox churches as an intermediary, supplicating God on our behalf.

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Seven Lakes Mother of God by the hand of Matthew Garrett, 2007In 1654, there was a plague that struck the region around the city of Kazan. The original of this icon was brought from the Seven Lakes Monastery and carried in procession with the Kazan icon of the Mother of God. Soon afterward the plague began to subside, and the icon was brought into people’s homes until the plague had gone away completely.

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Korsun Mother of God by the hand of Matthew Garrett, 2009

The original of this icon, celebrated on 9 October, takes its name from the Russian rendering of Cherson, the ancient Greek city on the Black Sea. Reputed to work miracles, in 988 the icon was removed from Cherson and “translated” to Kiev. Later it resided in Novgorod and in Moscow’s Dormition Cathedral. — 8″ x 10″

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